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Cat allergy vaccine....

Another promising discovery - wonder if they've got one for allergy to rats...

Cat Allergy Vaccine Safe and Effective, Study Suggests

ScienceDaily (Apr. 1, 2011) — Good-bye itching, watering eyes and sneezing. McMaster University researchers have developed a vaccine which successfully treats people with an allergy to cats.

Traditionally, frequent allergy shots have been considered the most effective way to bring relief -- other than getting rid of the family pet -- for the eight to 10% of the population allergic to cats.

Both options -- one difficult and costly, the other troubling -- may now be tossed aside thanks to the work of immunologist Mark Larché, professor in the Department of Medicine in the Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine and Canada Research Chair in Allergy & Immune Tolerance.

Building on research he's conducted for the past 10 years in Canada and Britain, Larché and his research team have developed a vaccine which is effective and safe with almost no side effects. The research is published in a recent (January 2011) issue of the Journal of Allergy & Clinical Immunology.
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Comments

( 2 comments — Leave a comment )
lemmozine
Apr. 8th, 2011 06:23 am (UTC)
I tried to comment yesterday & it wasn't working. LJ has been having some problems lately.

Anyhow, what I wanted to say is, from my point of view, it sounds like the cure is worse than the disease. And the disease is pretty bad. I do not visit my cat-owning friends at home. It's not sneezing and itching I'm worried about. My symptoms, after cat exposure, are wheezing and severe shortness of breath.

Still, having to get one or more vaccinations just so I can visit a friend's house seems to me more cumbersome than simply seeing my friends in an alternate setting.
kayshapero
Apr. 8th, 2011 06:51 am (UTC)
I gather LJ has been under attack, though why and by whom is unclear (though the rumors are entertaining).

I think this vaccine is meant more for people who HAVE to interact with felidae for one reason or another. Say, you've already got a cat and have developed an allergy (it happens). Or you're a veterinarian, or pet store employee or pet shelter worker or the like.

Consider also the perils of accidental exposure. I'm allergic to rats, and once was inadvertently seated in a corner of a room which usually contained the host's pet rats during a fannish get-together. I spent the next day mainlining anti-allergens and feeling ghastly. Extends to mice and I think it's expanding to hamsters, too. If they had such a vaccination for rats I would take it.
( 2 comments — Leave a comment )